Research interests

  • Wild bee Ecology
  • Community assembly processes
  • Land use impacts on biodiversity
  • Agroecology

Scientific projects

Effect of land use and landscape composition on wild bee pollinators in agrosystems

The persistence of plant and animal populations in agricultural landscapes is important for both, maintaining ecosystem services and the conservation of threatened species. On the one hand, after the destruction of natural habitats, man-made semi-natural habitats are some of the most species-rich remaining habitat types in central Europe, on the other hand, insects such as wild bees suffer from ongoing land use intensification and many species show negative population trends. The dynamics behind the ongoing wild bee declines are often hard to spot, as they are caused by multiple, interacting, and sometimes synergistic factors.

The work on my PhD thesis is associated with the BienABest program, a nationwide monitoring scheme, which aims at assessing biodiversity and pollination potential of wild bees. I am reaching for a deeper understanding about what can be done to promote wild bee diversity in agroecosystems and thereby secure pollination services in the ongoing future. To achieve this, I evaluate which key stressors wild bees are exposed to and search for strategies to mitigate the negative effects induced by them.

 

Contact

M.Sc. Ulrich Neumüller
Institute of Evolutionary Ecology and Conservation Genomics
University of Ulm
Albert-Einstein-Allee 11
D-89081 Ulm, Germany
Tel. +49 (0)731 50 22691
Fax +49 (0)731 50 22683
Office: M25 4113