Research interests

  • The role of stressful childhood experiences and traumatic events in the aetiology of mental disorders
  • (Intergenerational) effect and association of stress, trauma and stressful childhood experiences on mitochondrial function, inflammation, oxidative stress and physiological stress regulation
  • Reversibility of biomolecular consequences of chronic and traumatic stress through trauma therapy in patients with post-traumatic stress disorder
  • Comparison of trauma-focused therapy methods (cognitive-behavioural vs. psychodynamic) for a better understanding of post-traumatic stress disorder after traumatic experiences in childhood
  • Effectiveness of hypnotherapy at the biomolecular level

Projects

  • ENHANCE: Molecular, bioenergetic and immunological effects of trauma-focused psychotherapy in patients with posttraumatic stress disorder and experiences of abuse, maltreatment and neglect in childhood and adolescence
  • HypnoTreat: Biomolecular effects of hypnotherapy
  • "My childhood - your childhood": Intergenerational transmission of psychological and biological effects of experiences of abuse, maltreatment & neglect in childhood

Teaching

  • Winter semester 2020/2021:
    Therapy of complex trauma-related disorders - theory and practice (Master, psychology)
  • Winter semester 2019/2020
    Seminar: "Dissociation - Etiology, biological correlates and therapy" (Assistant lecturer; Master, Psychology)
  • Summer semester 2020
    Clinical disorders after abuse, maltreatment and neglect in childhood and therapeutic interventions (Bachelor, Psychology)

Alisha Winter

Alisha-Lynn Winter studied psychology at the University of Ulm from 2014 - 2019. During her studies, she completed an internship at the Treatment Center for Torture Victims in Ulm and gained experience in Human Resources at Teva Pharmaceutical lndustries.
2018-2019 she was a student assistant at the ZNL Transfer Center for Neuroscience and Learning.
In her final theses, Alisha-Lynn Winter focused on the characterization of mitochondrial function in healthy aging and the role of childhood maltreatment in relation to melatonin concentrations in hair and associated changes in mitochondrial function in mother-child dyads.
Since December 2019, she has been working on her doctoral thesis at the Department of Clinical & Biological Psychology at the University of Ulm.
Her research focuses on biomolecular consequences of chronic and traumatic stress and their reversibility through trauma-focused psychotherapy as well as the (intergenerational) effects and association of stress, trauma and stressful childhood experiences on mitochondrial function, inflammation, oxidative stress and physiological stress regulation.

Alisha Winter
Doktorandin

Alisha Winter
☎ +49 731-5026597
Π 47.2.409

Consultation hours
on appointment