Kollegiaten

Tamina Hagemann

Tamina Hagemann

In my PhD, I am interested in breath research. The specific goal of my work is to develop a platform combining different analytical methods so that the broadest scope of breath analytes possible can be detected with one single system. At the moment, I am focusing on combining infrared spectroscopy and differential ion mobility spectrometry.

tamina.hagemann(at)uni-ulm.de

Johannes Glöckler

Johannes Glöckler

The goal of my PhD studies is to develop sensor systems for the continuous diagnosis of exhaled breath. My main attention lies on the detection of biomarkers which are linked to particular metabolic processes and diseases. Therefore, I use next-generation miniaturized and integrated mid-infrared spectroscopic sensing technologies and combine these with other analytical methods, like an electronic Nose, for comprehensive multi-component diagnostics.

Mahdi Rajabzadeh

Mahdi Rajabzadeh

In June 2016, I joined the Institute of Microeletronics at University of Ulm as research assistance under the supervision of Prof. Maurits Ortmanns, where I worked on Bio-amplifiers. I started my PhD at the University of Ulm in October 2016 on the topic: Electrochemical Sensor Integrated Circuits. Currently, I am working on developing multi-channel implementations of electrochemical measurement techniques on CMOS integrated circuits for use on lung epithelia in vitro.

mahdi.rajabzadeh(at)uni-ulm.de

Kathrin Diem

Kathrin Diem

My PhD project focuses on the role caveolae play in alveolar mechanobiology.  Therefore, I am investigating alveolar epithelial cells and their response to mechanical stress in terms of flexibility, surfactant secretion and intracellular calcium release. Furthermore, I am interested in how knockout of caveolar proteins alters these factors.

kathrin.diem(at)uni-ulm.de

Anngrit Lutz

Anngrit Lutz

I am a PhD student in the Institute of General Physiology under the supervision of PD Dr. Edward Felder. My project focuses on the mechanical properties of keratin intermediate filaments (KFs) in alveolar epithelial cells. I aim to elucidate the signaling pathways involved in stretch induced phosphorylation of KFs and the consequences of KF phosphorylation for a cell’s tensile property.

anngrit.lutz(at)uni-ulm.de

Fabian Zink

Fabian Zink

My work is about establishing electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy - the gold standard method to measure radicals - for the measurement of reactive oxygen and nitrogen species (ROS/RNS) in biological samples such as cell suspensions or blood. Those measurements on a gold standard platform will then serve as a reference for more commonly used methodologies in biological laboratories but also for a miniaturized point-of-care EPR device developed by collaboration partners in Pulmosens. Furthermore, I am interested in immune cell metabolism as determined by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

Sven Daboss

Sven Daboss

I work on advanced scanning probe techniques. New types of microbiosensors for atomic force - scanning electrochemical microscopy (AFM-SECM) are developed, where the probe is modified with biosensing architectures enabling the selective detection of signaling molecules at cellular level.

Carolin Schilpp

Carolin Schilpp

In my PhD studies I´m focusing on progressive damage mechanisms to the lung epithelium. The focus is on elaborating how damages are spreading over the epithelium and how tight junction proteins are affected. Furthermore, I am trying to establish a method for investigating local ion concentrations via nanosensors on human primary epithelial lung cells.

Matthias Häberle

Matthias Häberle

My research focus is on microelectronics for live sciences and material research applications. Our goal is to develope novel and application-oriented transimpedance amplifiers for current detection. Low noise and fast transimpedance amplifiers can greatly improve the scanning ion-conductance microscopy topography and time-resolution, which is highly benefical for living-cell mapping.

Jing Lin

Jing Lin

I form multifunctional sensor on the surface of ultra-microelectrode through scanning electrochemical microscopy (SECM), the advance multifunctional sensor provide chemical information that related with the change of time and space.

Arezo Behroudj

Arezo Behroudj

I studied Advanced Materials in the field of Nanomaterials at Ulm University and received my M. Sc. degree in 2015. Afterwards I started working as a research assistant to pursue a PhD degree at institute of electron devices and circuits, Ulm University under supervision of Prof. Dr.-Ing. Steffen Strehle and the main focus of my current research is about silicon nanowires synthesis and relevant integration techniques in order to fabricate nanoscale sensors and probes namely for AFM applications. In June 2017 I became a member of the research training group of PULMOSENS.

Jonas Pfeil

Jonas Pfeil

I study the long term evolution of the microrheological properties of lung fibroplast when exposed to Latrunculin B. For this I use a continuous high-speed recording and real time tracking with a 32x32 pixel camera and an FPGA microcontroller. I try to map the change of cell stiffness when the creation of Keratin is inhibited and how the cell recovers when the drug is washed out again.

Michael Roos

Michael Roos

After receiving my B.Sc. and my M.Sc. in Chemical engineering at the Technische Universität München, I started my PhD at the Institute for Electron Devices and Circuits in October 2016, supervised by Prof. Strehle. In cooperation with Dr. Oliver Wittekindt and Carolin Schilpp from Prof. Dietl’s Institute of General Physiology, I develop nanosensors made of silicon nanowires to measure ion concentration in the thin aqueous apical surface liquid layer (ASL) on top of human epithelial cells. Since October 2017, I am also the elected speaker of the Pulmosens graduates.

Tamara Merz

Tamara Merz

The aim of my project is to investigate the role of hydrogen sulfide in glucose utilization and mitochondrial function during circulatory shock. Metabolic acidosis and mitochondrial dysfunction are key occurrences in physiological stress and affected by the availability of the gaseous mediator hydrogen sulfide. I analyze these components of cellular metabolism with the help of high-resolution respirometry, stable isotope administration and evaluation, and calorimetry.

Susan Tavakoli

Susan Tavakoli

The goal of my project is to combine an artificial lung-on-a-chip with a strain sensor. Based on the conventional Traction Force Microscopy method, this sensor would be used to monitor how cell-generated forces change under external strain.

Jassim Shahbaz

Jassim Shahbaz

My research is focused on developing semiconductor gas sensors for the detection of gases present in the human breath. The semiconductor (InGaN) heterostructures are fabricated in our cleanroom and characterised optically in the photoluminescence lab where the gas sensing is also performed. The emphasis of the project is hydrogen sulphide gas detection, which can provide crucial information about the health state of a patient.

Martin Schneidereit

Martin Schneidereit

Light-emitting diodes (LEDs) have become common nowadays for lighting applications in homes, offices, factories etc. as they are highly efficient, have a long livespan and become more and more luminescent with every new development. Their general structure can also be used for sensor applications, as by treating the surface of an LED, its emission can become dependent on surface-adsorbed molecules. By performing Photoluminescence-Spectroscopy (PL) on this sensor structure, a molecule-dependent signal can be obtained which opens up numerous applications in medicine and processing technologies. In order to optimise such sensor structures for highest sensitivity, simulations have to be carried out by e.g. nextNano. Cooperations within the project exist with the physics and chemistry department.

martin.schneidereit(at)uni-ulm.de

Gourab Dutta Banik

Gourab Dutta Banik

I am a Postdoctoral Research Fellow in the Institute of Analytical and Bio-Analytical Chemistry. I did my PhD from S.N. Bose National Centre for Basic Sciences, India. During my PhD, I developed a cavity ring down spectrometer coupled with a mid-IR quantum cascade laser to detect the trace molecules in exhaled human breath which have the wide importance in bio medical diagnosis. Here, the goal of my project is to develop miniaturized and integrated mid-infrared ring-down spectroscopy technique for breath analysis.

gourab.dutta-banik(at)uni-ulm.de

Angelika Kaiser

Angelika Kaiser

In my research I focus on resistive gas detection of the biomarker hydrogen sulfide (H_{2}S) in the parts per billion range by using nanostructured zinc oxide (ZnO).  The ZnO is grown by chemical vapor deposition (CVD). Here, different types of ZnO nanowires (NW) are fabricated, either by the vapor-liquid-solid (VLS) method with gold catalyst on silicon, or by the vapor-solid (VS) method without catalyst on sapphire. My main interest is to investigate the beneficial effect of  post-synthesis treatment of the ZnO NW, such as high temperature annealing in different gaseous atmospheres and coating with catalytic metal nanoparticles, on the development of a highly selective artificial e-Nose.

angelika.kaiser(at)uni-ulm.de

Eva Oswald

Eva Oswald

In my PhD I am working on pipette-based scanning probe techniques for cell measurements. My focus is to measure ion concentrations in the aqueous apical surface liquid layer of human epithelial cells. Therefore, I am working on the combination of scanning ion conductance microscopy (SICM) with liquid ion-selective microelectrodes.

eva-1.oswald(at)uni-ulm.de