Kollegiaten

Jonas Pfeil

Jonas Pfeil

I study the long term evolution of the microrheological properties of lung fibroplast when exposed to Latrunculin B. For this I use a continuous high-speed recording and real time tracking with a 32x32 pixel camera and an FPGA microcontroller. I try to map the change of cell stiffness when the creation of Keratin is inhibited and how the cell recovers when the drug is washed out again.

Johannes Glöckler

Johannes Glöckler

The goal of my PhD studies is to develop sensor systems for the continuous diagnosis of exhaled breath. My main attention lies on the detection of biomarkers which are linked to particular metabolic processes and diseases. Therefore, I use next-generation miniaturized and integrated mid-infrared spectroscopic sensing technologies and combine these with other analytical methods, like an electronic Nose, for comprehensive multi-component diagnostics.

Angelika Kaiser

Angelika Kaiser

In my research I focus on resistive gas detection of the biomarker hydrogen sulfide (H_{2}S) in the parts per billion range by using nanostructured zinc oxide (ZnO).  The ZnO is grown by chemical vapor deposition (CVD). Here, different types of ZnO nanowires (NW) are fabricated, either by the vapor-liquid-solid (VLS) method with gold catalyst on silicon, or by the vapor-solid (VS) method without catalyst on sapphire. My main interest is to investigate the beneficial effect of  post-synthesis treatment of the ZnO NW, such as high temperature annealing in different gaseous atmospheres and coating with catalytic metal nanoparticles, on the development of a highly selective artificial e-Nose.

angelika.kaiser(at)uni-ulm.de

Eva Oswald

Eva Oswald

In my PhD I am working on pipette-based scanning probe techniques for cell measurements. My focus is to measure ion concentrations in the aqueous apical surface liquid layer of human epithelial cells. Therefore, I am working on the combination of scanning ion conductance microscopy (SICM) with liquid ion-selective microelectrodes.

eva-1.oswald(at)uni-ulm.de

Gourab Dutta Banik

Gourab Dutta Banik

I am a Postdoctoral Research Fellow in the Institute of Analytical and Bio-Analytical Chemistry. I did my PhD from S.N. Bose National Centre for Basic Sciences, India. During my PhD, I developed a cavity ring down spectrometer coupled with a mid-IR quantum cascade laser to detect the trace molecules in exhaled human breath which have the wide importance in bio medical diagnosis. Here, the goal of my project is to develop miniaturized and integrated mid-infrared ring-down spectroscopy technique for breath analysis.

gourab.dutta-banik(at)uni-ulm.de

Peter Kolb

Peter Kolb

The focus of my PhD project is the development of strain sensors for lung-on-a-chip microdevices, based on the combination of plasmonic nanoparticles and soft substrates. Integrating structured plasmonic particle arrays into polydimethylsiloxane membranes enables strain sensing by measuring the spectral shifts of plasmon resonances. My research combines multiple lithography methods with analysis via scanning electron microscopy, atomic force microscopy, and spectroscopy, supported by electromagnetic simulations.

peter.kolb(at)uni-ulm.de

Annika Schundner

Annika Schundner

I am a PhD student in the Institute of General Physiology under the supervision of Prof. Dr. Manfred Frick. My studies focus on mechanosensing in the distal lung. Thereby I am especially interested in the response of alveolar epithelial / mesenchymal cells to mechanical stimuli. Additionally, I try to elucidate the role of caveolae and other mechanoresponsive structures in this context and their influence on fibrotic processes.

annika.schundner(at)uni-ulm.de

Alexander Janik

Alexander Janik

Gaining insights into cell mechanics by optical means is what I am concerned with. My setup is able to stretch cells with a parallel laser beam and to detect the resulting deformation. The focus of my work are improvements on optics and data evaluation as well as the application of the technique on lung cells, which undergo cyclic mechanical stress.

alexander.janik(at)uni-ulm.de

Andreas Hellmann

Andreas Hellmann

In my PhD I am working on the electrochemical detection of signal molecules with modified microelectrodes for biomedical applications. At the moment, I am focusing on the ATP-detection at alveolar epithelial cells as well as the investigation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and catecholamines at granulocytes and peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC).

andreas.hellmann(at)uni-ulm.de

Michael Hlavatsch

Michael Hlavatsch

The project idea of my thesis is the development of new innovative sensors for exhaled breath analysis for medical applications. The aim is to combine established methods of mid-infrared spectroscopy and eNose measurement methods to gain new insights into volatile organic compounds of the exhaled breath that are directly linked to certain metabolic processes and diseases of the lungs. When linking and developing a new sensor, the integration of as yet unused analytical spectroscopic methods in the short- and long-wave infrared range will also be considered, thus providing further insights into exhaled breath analysis.

michael.hlavatsch(at)uni-ulm.de

Philipp Hinz

Philipp Hinz

My contribution to Pulmosens is the development and analysis of new electromagnetic mm-wave/THz sensors for contact-free and reactionless in-vitro measurements of vital conditions (i.e. barrier properties) of pulmonary epithelial cells. I'm working in the Institut für Mikrowellentechnik and my supervisor is Prof. Dr. Christian Damm.

Eva Wolfschmitt

Eva Wolfschmitt

The project of my PhD thesis deals with investigating stress-induced alterations in the metabolism of immune cells during circulatory shock. Changes in the glucose and glutamine utilization of PBMCs and granulocytes are detected with metabolic flux analysis by stable isotope labeling and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. Additionally, reactive oxygen species are determined by electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy for biological samples.

Denis Nalbantoglu

Denis Nalbantoglu

My PhD project focuses on the ligand- independent translocation of the glucocorticoid receptor in different lung cells during mechanostimulation and  its influence on immunregulatory glucocorticoid receptor target genes and pathways. The details of this mechanism are not well described and understood yet and are therefore in focus of my project.

Maria Braune

Maria Braune

I am a PhD student at the Institute of Pharmacology and Toxicology and in my project, I am interested in the pathophysiological mechanisms of pertussis toxin in the lung. Pertussis toxin is a bacterial protein toxin produced by Bordetella pertussis that causes the severe childhood disease whooping cough. The goal of my work is to characterize the effects of pertussis toxin on specific endpoints such as apical surface liquid, epithelial barrier function, and signal molecules like ATP in a human airway epithelial model.

Melanie Hogg

Melanie Hogg

In my PhD project I deal with stable isotope-based quantification of whole-body metabolism during circulatory shock. The 13CO2/12CO2-isotope-ratio in the breath gas and the isotope enrichment in plasma after intake of stable, non-radioactive 13C-labeled substrates are determined by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC/MS). Also, I investigate the metabolic effect of catecholamines. Therefore, I am developing a GC/MS method for the quantification of endo- and exogenous catecholamines in plasma.

Youssef Dawoud

Youssef Dawoud

The focus of the project is to propose data-driven approaches for cell detection in microscopy images. To demonstrate generalization capabilities, the proposed approaches should also function on counting different class of objects such as humans in urban scenes or penguins. The horsepower of the project are deep neural networks where the presence of labels is under question. Supervised, weakly-supervised, and self-supervised learning will be explored for accomplishing the project.